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A Note About Thank You Notes - A Fine Press
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The Vertex Collection Exclusivity
Apr 17 2017

A Note About Thank You Notes

Much has been written about the power of thank you notes. And, with some thanks to Jimmy Fallon, the art of gratitude (however tongue-in-cheek it may be) is at least in the peripheral conscious of the world today.

However, there’s a fairly nefarious trend in “written” correspondence – one that has no place in genuine gratitude.

Just say no to “digitally handwritten” cards.

Nothing says 'I'm lazy' more than printed 'handwriting' in a notecard. Click To Tweet

The way I see it, there are two reasons a reasonable person might use to rationalize sending such a card:

  • You don’t have the time
  • Your handwriting is embarrassing.

These can both be boiled down to priorities.

If you value the relationships in your life and career, prioritize writing notes and practicing your handwriting.

It’s that simple.

Don’t let your bad handwriting prevent you from sending a note today. Send them now and as you improve your handwriting.

Just like when you ran track in college or played flute in high school, good handwriting takes practice. Grab a notebook and spend ten minutes a day writing. Use this to find inspiration and practice – one letter at a time, then one word at a time – daily.

It’s simple and effective. And you don’t look lazy.

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